Part 1: Stepping into the woods

15. 02. 2021

New year, new theme. That’s how we’ve done it at Maloja since the very first day. It’s also why, since 2004, we’ve managed to create 16 completely new collections with such a wide range of motifs. For our 17th collection “Soul in the Woods”, we’ve been fully immersed with forests, and life together there.

New year, new theme. That’s how we’ve done it at Maloja since the very first day. It’s also why, since 2004, we’ve managed to create 16 completely new collections with such a wide range of motifs. For our 17th collection “Soul in the Woods”, we’ve been fully immersed with forests, and life together there.


A Natural Connection


We’d already heard and read a lot about life together in the forests. About cooperation and co-existence, solidarity and community. Using a small group of trees, national park ranger Jochen showed us just how smart and finely coordinated the “forest system” actually is. What seemed like just a tree surrounded by a bit of green at first glance turned out to be a real living community. The juniper protects other trees from over-browsing by wildlife with its prickly needles. At the same time, it provides a home and protection for mice, rabbits and birds that hide in the earth underneath. And that’s just one example of many…


Change Of Perspective


We all know that “it’s all a question of perspective”. But looking at the forest “another” way is really worth it. Sitting there in complete silence and widening your focus metre by metre, from the shapes and structures directly in front of you, to the shapes of the next tree, then the one after that, and then ten metres away. Even when looking at the ground there are different patterns compared to high above in the treetops. When you look at the forest from different perspectives, you truly see it for what it is: pure diversity.


The Colours Of The Forest


From a distance, a forest might seem like a green, brown and grey piece of land. Look closer, and you discover a mosaic made up of a multitude of forest structures. And up close, the forest has endless amounts of colours and shades. This is where we find all the nuances we can imagine: grass green, moss green, leafy green, lichen green. Wild strawberry red, elder red, rose hip red. Prunella flower purple, thistle violet, bilberry blue. Leaf brown, bark brown, spruce cone brown…


Colour Capture


We’d brought along a precision scanner to match the collection’s colour palette with the original shades of the forest as accurately as possible. This device lets us scan any material and determine its exact colour value. But what we didn’t know until we got to the forest was that the scanner only works with an internet connection. Which we had to achieve with a weak mobile signal in a narrow mountain pass.

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