Dialas

11. 02. 2019

From Dialas, to Ganes, to Salige, myths and fables about “Wild Women” are rife throughout the Alps. They live along lakes and rivers, in meadows and forests, in caves and on cliffs, on glaciers and along exposed ridges. They are almost like nature’s good spirits. They protect animals and plants. They help people and offer their wisdom.

From Dialas, to Ganes, to Salige, myths and fables about “Wild Women” are rife throughout the Alps. They live along lakes and rivers, in meadows and forests, in caves and on cliffs, on glaciers and along exposed ridges. They are almost like nature’s good spirits. They protect animals and plants. They help people and offer their wisdom.

The legends surrounding these beings are as diverse as the places where they live. And yet, the same tales are told about them again and again all over the Alps. They tell farmers when it’s best to sow and harvest. They cut the wheat and help with haymaking. They offer balls of yarn that can never be fully unravelled, and loaves of bread that never grow smaller.

As long as people listen to their advice, never question their support and treat them with respect, they can rely on these good female spirits. Should people become greedy or mistreat them, everything falls apart. The women disappear – and with them, happiness and prosperity.

Dialas, Ganes, Salige or whatever these Wild Women are called in legends, whether they’re described as good mountain spirits, goddesses or fairies, we find the tales told about them fascinating. They’re about values that mean a lot to us personally. And like a compass we can use them to find our way time and time again, they guide us.

The key message of the Wild Women is as current as ever: Everything in moderation. Treat both nature and fellow people with respect. Be honest. Stay grounded. Have faith. This is a powerful message. It inspires courage. And it gives us the confidence that, so long as you handle life with decency and soul, all will be well.


Find out more about the development of the "Dialas" collection:

Tales of old to products of today

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